Archives

  1. Missoula Public Library

    The new building houses four other community organizations (MCAT, Families First Learning Lab, SpectrUM Discovery Area, and the University of Montana Living Lab) to create a library, museum, and science and community center that blends Missoula’s rich heritage with world-class innovations all under one roof. The design process involved an intensive week-long visioning session with leadership from the library and partner organizations to establish project goals and guiding principles. The main floor offers a marketplace with a cafe, retail store, new library materials, and the audiovisual collection; a makerspace; MCAT’s high tech production studio, equipment check-out services, and sound booths; a teens’ area; and the University of Montana Living Lab. Focused on children, families, and play, the second floor houses the Hank and Nancy Harrington Children’s Library, Families First Learning Lab, SpectrUM Disovery Area, and a mix of collaborative learning spaces shared by the partner organizations. The third floor includes a demonstration kitchen, reference services, fiction and nonfiction collections, a business center, and genealogy center. The top floor provides spaces for public engagement and gathering and access to an exterior patio.

    MSR Design served as design architect and interior designer, and A&E Design was the architect of record.

     

     

  2. Madison Public Market

    Key goals for the project are to create architecture that supports food and vendor equity and promotes Madison’s program to eliminate barriers for entrepreneurship in disadvantaged populations; offer an environment that attracts commercial, recreational and social activities; and provide an authentic, inspiring, animated public place that welcomes the entire community. The project entails converting a municipal fleet services building into an open and vibrant community space. Exploring architecture’s role in food equity and business incubation, the design offers flexible spaces to support a variety of vendors sizes, services, and experiences to ensure individual and mutual economic success. The new market will incorporate advanced stormwater management strategies to reduce runoff in a flood-prone location, focusing on physical, social, and urban resilience. The project involved a robust community engagement process to ensure that diverse voices and perspectives were included. The process included a feedback loop to demonstrate how input was incorporated and meeting with focus groups and potential vendors.

  3. MSR Design 510 Marquette Studio

    Located in a large open space on the second floor of a 1925 office building, MSR Design’s new studio cultivates the firm’s design culture through spaces that support the myriad ways of making architecture and make the design process visible. The design arranges workstations around the perimeter near large windows that overlook the urban setting. Staff can choose from a mix of flexible spaces for individual focus or collaboration in a dynamic environment that promotes productivity and creativity. The juxtaposition of a solid black box inserted into the open, white perimeter areas defines and delineates the various zones. The project’s heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system includes enhanced air filtration, monitors, and controls for the health and well-being of staff and visitors. The project has achieved Living Building Challenge (LBC) Petal Certification for the materials, beauty, and equity petals.

     

  4. Hennepin County Library Southdale Library & Edina Art Center

    This new regional library and art gallery will serve as an extension of an 8-acre urban green space, featuring a trailhead for regional trails, activated terrain, native plantings, and wetland gardens. A partnership between the Hennepin County Library and Edina Art Center, the new building will showcase how these community organizations are better together. The library and arts center is designed to meet the ambitious goals of Hennepin County’s Climate Action Plan and the State of Minnesota’s B3 sustainable guidelines. A combination of passive design, a high-performance façade, efficient building systems, and on-site renewables will enable the project to achieve near net-zero energy. The completed design will include a spectrum of restorative landscapes, from open water within the low areas of the site to wet prairies, a freshwater marsh, tallgrass prairies, and oak barrens. The library and arts center will also serve as a trailhead for the Nine Mile Creek regional trail system and provide a missing link in the Edina Promenade to connect local parks and regional assets.

  5. Capitol Region Watershed District Office

    This adaptive reuse project involves the conversion of a supply garage from the 1940s into a new workplace and educational environment for Capitol Region Watershed District (CRWD), an environmental stewardship organization. The renewed building utilizes sustainable design building principles, including innovative stormwater management practices and energy efficiency measures to conserve natural resources, create a healthy workplace, and protect the Mississippi River and its native habitat.

    The office design promotes human health and well-being. The open and unified workplace fosters a culture of collaboration, communication, and partnerships. Flexible meeting spaces not only accommodate internal staff meetings, but also are available for community organizations to use. Providing maximum workplace choice and flexibility, the office features a mix of spaces that support staff socialization and informal meetings, as well as quiet, focused tasks. A community pocket park provides space for interactive learning and recreation.

  6. L.E. Phillips Memorial Public Library

    Design guiding principles for this library building transformation included creating a destination for the region that serves as the heart of the city and linking the building to the Eau Claire River and downtown civic facilities. Stakeholder-directed improvements include a 200-seat program space, an expanded children’s area, a mix of meeting rooms, quiet spaces for study, space for tweens and teens, and a learning lab. Inclusive design elements include aspects that support neurodiversity, gender-inclusive toilet rooms, and comfort rooms.

    A makerspace called the Dabble Box and innovation lab spaces provide access to specialized technology, teaching kitchen equipment, and art equipment to support maker sessions, STEAM-based education, and nutrition literacy. All major building systems, dating back to 1975, were replaced with more efficient and sustainable systems, including a geothermal heating and cooling system that runs below the plaza. Redesigned vertical circulation provides more intuitive wayfinding and better visual connections between all four floors.

  7. KSMQ PBS Broadcast Center

    This new broadcast center and headquarters for KSMQ, a PBS member station, serves southeast Minnesota and northeast Iowa. Designed for flexibility, the front portion of the building can be closed off to give outside groups access to conference rooms during off hours without the need for KSMQ staff supervision. The studio features a robotic camera system. A terrazzo floor mural and sliding art wall showcase art by local artists. The center also includes an outdoor stage and lawn for live performances.

    The facility was designed and constructed according to the rigorous B3 Guidelines, including stormwater retention ponds that remove 80% of total suspended solids, 80% reduction in energy use, a bee lawn requiring limited mowing, wiring for future EV charging stations, and 40% increased vegetated area onsite from 0% preconstruction. All interior materials are low/no VOC, exceeding B3 guidelines. The building has specialized acoustic design, vastly improved air quality, 87% daylight autonomy (100% of regularly occupied spaces have outdoor views), new robotic operation broadcast production areas, community spaces, and wellness features.

  8. Sno-Isle Libraries Darrington Library

    This renovation project will provide new and enhanced library services to the Darrington community. Library design features resulted from an extensive public engagement process to reflect community needs and a truly local context. It is the first Sno-Isle Libraries project to implement elements from the Capital Framework, Design Guidelines, and Signage Standards that MSR Design developed with the library. The renovated building will include an enclosed study room, a business center, a storytime room, and outdoor space, which is connected to the existing meeting room for maximum flexibility.

  9. Songdo International City Library Design Competition

    MSR Design’s design competition submission for the Songdo International City Library proposes 21st-century library services in a series of 24/7 spaces connected to the public park system. The dramatic engagement of a spiraling park connects all four levels of service together through outdoor public programming that can operate day and night. A central community core and high performing building enclosure ensure daylight reaches all library spaces and promote connectivity between generations. The flexible library spaces between the community core and park areas are designed to accommodate active and passive activities, while allowing direct access to information.

  10. North Shore Bank

    The renovation offers a welcoming, customer-focused atmosphere that simultaneously represents the independent, locally-owned bank’s history and position within the Duluth community and supports its forward-thinking approach to banking. The design preserves elements of the building’s mid-century architecture considered sacred, including original wood veneer panels, the vault, terrazzo stairs, a metal wall-mounted clock, wood ceiling beams, travertine flooring, and textured brick walls. The overall layout clusters private offices and closed conference rooms in the center with open public spaces, such as the lobby concierge desk, gallery, entry lounge, social pantry, and writing nook, located along the perimeter. The removal of a large, low soffit that housed a non-operating HVAC system creates a grander experience upon entering the building from Superior Street and draws daylight into the interior. A new audio system, flexible lighting, and a diverse mix of seating support hosted events and special gatherings, as well as everyday operations. A rich palette and composition of bronze, walnut, stone, glass, terrazzo, and wool reflect mid-century modern textures and tones, while also taking cues from the bank’s newly updated brand.