Archives

  1. Missoula Public Library

    The new building houses four other community organizations (MCAT, Families First Learning Lab, the University of Montana SpectrUM Discovery Area, and the University of Montana Living Lab) to create a library, museum, and science and community center that blends Missoula’s rich heritage with world-class innovations all under one roof. The design process involved an intensive week-long visioning session with leadership from the library and partner organizations to establish project goals and guiding principles. The main floor offers a marketplace with a cafe, retail store, new library materials, and the audiovisual collection; a makerspace; MCAT’s high tech production studio, equipment check-out services, and sound booths; a teens’ area; and the University of Montana Living Lab. Focused on children, families, and play, the second floor houses the Hank and Nancy Harrington Children’s Library, Families First Learning Lab, University of Montana SpectrUM Disovery Area, and a mix of collaborative learning spaces shared by the partner organizations. The third floor includes a demonstration kitchen, reference services, fiction and nonfiction collections, a business center, and genealogy center. The top floor provides spaces for public engagement and gathering and access to an exterior patio.

     

     

  2. Songdo International City Library Design Competition

    MSR Design’s design competition submission for the Songdo International City Library proposes 21st-century library services in a series of 24/7 spaces connected to the public park system. The dramatic engagement of a spiraling park connects all four levels of service together through outdoor public programming that can operate day and night. A central community core and high performing building enclosure ensure daylight reaches all library spaces and promote connectivity between generations. The flexible library spaces between the community core and park areas are designed to accommodate active and passive activities, while allowing direct access to information.

  3. MSR Design 510 Marquette Studio

    Located in a large open space on the second floor of a 1925 office building, MSR Design’s new studio cultivates the firm’s design culture through spaces that support the myriad ways of making architecture and make the design process visible. The design arranges workstations around the perimeter near large windows that overlook the urban setting. Staff can choose from a mix of flexible spaces for individual focus or collaboration in a dynamic environment that promotes productivity and creativity. The juxtaposition of a solid black box inserted into the open, white perimeter areas defines and delineates the various zones. The project’s heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system includes enhanced air filtration, monitors, and controls for the health and well-being of staff and visitors. The project has achieved Living Building Challenge (LBC) Petal Certification for the materials, beauty, and equity petals.

     

  4. North Shore Bank

    The renovation offers a welcoming, customer-focused atmosphere that simultaneously represents the independent, locally-owned bank’s history and position within the Duluth community and supports its forward-thinking approach to banking. The design preserves elements of the building’s mid-century architecture considered sacred, including original wood veneer panels, the vault, terrazzo stairs, a metal wall-mounted clock, wood ceiling beams, travertine flooring, and textured brick walls. The overall layout clusters private offices and closed conference rooms in the center with open public spaces, such as the lobby concierge desk, gallery, entry lounge, social pantry, and writing nook, located along the perimeter. The removal of a large, low soffit that housed a non-operating HVAC system creates a grander experience upon entering the building from Superior Street and draws daylight into the interior. A new audio system, flexible lighting, and a diverse mix of seating support hosted events and special gatherings, as well as everyday operations. A rich palette and composition of bronze, walnut, stone, glass, terrazzo, and wool reflect mid-century modern textures and tones, while also taking cues from the bank’s newly updated brand.

  5. Madison Municipal Building

    Constructed in 1929 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Madison Municipal Building originally functioned as a United States Postal Service facility and federal courthouse. The multi-phased renovation and reorganization uncovers and preserves the building’s historic character, while adapting it to serve 21st-century government functions. The project brings together various local government agencies, previously scattered across two buildings, to improve customer service and inter-agency communication. Certified LEED-NC v. 3 Platinum, the building transformation supports the health and well-being of staff, visitors, and the entire community.