Archives

  1. RIDC Mill 19

    A multi-phased adaptive reuse of a 1,300 foot-long, historic steel mill, the project is located within a larger development on a 170-acre brownfield site that is being transformed into a highly sustainable, mixed-use, high-tech innovation district. The design positions the new building as a box inside the steel structural frame of the old mill. It houses office space; areas for design, prototyping, and testing; and public areas, with tenants including Carnegie Mellon University’s Advanced Robotics Manufacturing Institute. The project features a range of sustainable measures to meet the goal of achieving LEED-NC v4 Gold certification and near net zero energy usage.

  2. Haverford College Visual Culture, Arts & Media (VCAM) Building

    Haverford College’s new Visual Culture, Arts, and Media (VCAM) building repurposes a gym built in 1900 into a vibrant 21st-century learning environment. The design preserves the old gym’s central, two-story vaulted space, while inserting a three-story, object study/media production classroom and creating a new living room for the campus. All primary program spaces open onto and animate the heart of the building—a three-story remnant of an indoor running track—that now functions as campus family room with kitchen, community table, display area, projection wall, and movable furniture. Classrooms, labs, offices, and presentation spaces encourage trans-disciplinary collaboration and experimentation in digital media, film, 3D fabrication, and material culture. The project is certified LEED-NC v. 3 Gold.

  3. MSR Design 510 Marquette Studio

    Located in a large open space on the second floor of a 1925 office building, MSR Design’s new studio cultivates the firm’s design culture through spaces that support the myriad ways of making architecture and make the design process visible. The design arranges workstations around the perimeter near large windows that overlook the urban setting. Staff can choose from a mix of flexible spaces for individual focus or collaboration in a dynamic environment that promotes productivity and creativity. The juxtaposition of a solid black box inserted into the open, white perimeter areas defines and delineates the various zones. The project’s heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system includes enhanced air filtration, monitors, and controls for the health and well-being of staff and visitors. The project has achieved Living Building Challenge (LBC) Petal Certification for the materials, beauty, and equity petals.

     

  4. Mill City Museum

    Located within the ruined walls of the National Historic Landmark Washburn A Mill, the Mill City Museum focuses on the stories of flour milling, water power, railroading, food product development, grain trading, and farming, as well as the related people, labor, and immigrant stories. With multiple entries on two levels, the museum functions as a porous link between downtown Minneapolis and the river. A must-see addition to the riverfront’s menu of cultural attractions, the museum furthers the city’s vision of reconnecting to its birthplace at Saint Anthony Falls.

  5. URBN Corporate Campus

    Housed in Philadelphia’s historic Navy Yard, this multi-phased corporate campus provides new design studios and office space for the company’s distinctive retail brands, while celebrating the idiosyncratic remnants of 125 years of shipbuilding. Embracing both the history of the Navy Yard and URBN’s modern culture by layering old and new, the design team found inspiration in the factory characteristics of the buildings—industrial materiality, open volumes, and access to daylight—to repurpose the buildings’ major function from production to creativity. The synthesis of four measures—art, culture, economy, and environment—results in the transformation from a production-based yard to a creativity-based campus.

  6. 101 Dupont Place

    Originally serving as the headquarters for DuPont de Nemours, Inc., the Dupont Building is an iconic building within the Rodney Square Historic District in downtown Wilmington. This project involved transforming the historic 13-story building into luxury apartments and office space. Through a neutral materials palette, the design honors the legacy of the building, while reinterpreting classic detailing with a modern approach to keep the building timeless. In an effort to preserve as much of the building’s historic fabric as possible, the executive conferencing suite with a two-story boardroom has been converted into a club room,  lounge, theater, and coworking space. Other amenities include a gym, dog wash station, and roof deck with dramatic views of downtown.

     

     

     

  7. Madison Municipal Building

    Constructed in 1929 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Madison Municipal Building originally functioned as a United States Postal Service facility and federal courthouse. The multi-phased renovation and reorganization uncovers and preserves the building’s historic character, while adapting it to serve 21st-century government functions. The project brings together various local government agencies, previously scattered across two buildings, to improve customer service and inter-agency communication. Certified LEED-NC v. 3 Platinum, the building transformation supports the health and well-being of staff, visitors, and the entire community.

  8. Washburn Lofts, 4th Floor Loft

    New, simple, modern additions complement the old mill’s re-exposed concrete shell and a graffiti-covered brick wall. An enclosed box in the center of the loft houses more quiet functions, including a study (that doubles as a guest room with a Murphy bed concealed in the millwork), bedrooms, and bathrooms. The open living and dining area and adjacent kitchen provide space for entertaining and offer stunning views of the Mississippi River. High-quality, neutral material choices provide consistency throughout the space, from the bleached wood floors and tiled bathrooms to the white walls contrasted with dark-stained oak millwork.

  9. Trolley Quarter Flats

    Located on the Wisconsin River on the edge of downtown, the site presented challenges. A dilapidated, but structurally-sound trolley shed and wood super-structure (used to lift carriages off the trolley platform for repairs), located on the site, were the last remnants of Wausau’s street trolley system, which operated from 1906 to 1940. Understanding the historic significance of these structures, the developer and design team preserved and incorporated them into the design. The 40-unit complex includes private outdoor areas for all dwelling units, private garden plots for each ground level unit, play and study areas for children inside and outside the building, community space for adults, and parking. It has served as a catalyst for further revitalization of the surrounding neighborhood and to strengthen Wausau’s downtown.

  10. Atrium Lofts

    After completing the Trolley Quarter Flats, the MSR  Design project team noticed an abandoned building next door with an interesting history. The Marathon Shoe Company East Side Plant was the best remaining representation of a leading industry in the City of Wausau in the first half of the 20th century. MSR Design provided analysis, guidance, and encouragement to preserve the historic factory, leading to its placement on the National Register of Historic Places by Preservation Design Works. Working with MetroPlains Development, we transformed the historic structure into market-rate and affordable housing. To retain the building’s character, the design team preserved the large volume, open floor plate, and few internal walls. The design enhances daylight throughout the space, using clerestory windows to fill the central volume and large windows in each unit.