Archives

  1. Haverford College Visual Culture, Arts & Media (VCAM) Building

    Haverford College’s new Visual Culture, Arts, and Media (VCAM) building repurposes a gym built in 1900 into a vibrant 21st-century learning environment. The design preserves the old gym’s central, two-story vaulted space, while inserting a three-story, object study/media production classroom and creating a new living room for the campus. All primary program spaces open onto and animate the heart of the building—a three-story remnant of an indoor running track—that now functions as campus family room with kitchen, community table, display area, projection wall, and movable furniture. Classrooms, labs, offices, and presentation spaces encourage trans-disciplinary collaboration and experimentation in digital media, film, 3D fabrication, and material culture. The project is certified LEED-NC v. 3 Gold.

  2. MSR Design 510 Marquette Studio

    Located in a large open space on the second floor of a 1925 office building, MSR Design’s new studio cultivates the firm’s design culture through spaces that support the myriad ways of making architecture and make the design process visible. The design arranges workstations around the perimeter near large windows that overlook the urban setting. Staff can choose from a mix of flexible spaces for individual focus or collaboration in a dynamic environment that promotes productivity and creativity. The juxtaposition of a solid black box inserted into the open, white perimeter areas defines and delineates the various zones. The project’s heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system includes enhanced air filtration, monitors, and controls for the health and well-being of staff and visitors. The project has achieved Living Building Challenge (LBC) Petal Certification for the materials, beauty, and equity petals.

     

  3. Tulsa City-County Central Library

    The design team targeted three primary goals for the project: 1. Become a downtown destination that contributes to renewal of the urban core. 2. Create a library building that responds to 21st-century library needs. 3. Be generative, positively impacting library users, the surrounding community, the library industry, and the environment.

    To achieve these goals, the design team crafted a building program and architectural response that includes a revitalized, humanized civic plaza and new public garden for programming and community events; a clear, secure entry sequence in which all ways of entering the library collect into one main lobby area; a new parking garage; an interactive education center; a maker space; and a destination children’s library with direct access to the garden. Sustainable measures include improved thermal performance of the entire building envelope, daylight harvesting and lighting strategies, and the first rooftop photovoltaic solar array installed on a Tulsa building.

  4. Workshop

    Converting a 100-year-old foundry in the heart of the Northeast Minneapolis Arts District into an innovative, multipurpose environment presented unique challenges. MSR worked closely with the start-up creative agency to help realize its future mission and purpose through the design process. The open, flexible layout accommodates everything from workplace and making/prototyping activities to exhibitions and weddings.

    Demolition and construction revealed treasures from past use, such as hidden fire doors, an underground tunnel, and pit. The design integrates these elements throughout as reminders of the building’s rich history. Massive, custom steel-and-glass entries open onto a steel deck, providing a porous connection to the street and neighborhood. The highly-flexible and ever-evolving space simultaneously accommodates the client’s original intent for the space (workplace) and new and unexpected uses (event space).

  5. Mill City Museum

    Located within the ruined walls of the National Historic Landmark Washburn A Mill, the Mill City Museum focuses on the stories of flour milling, water power, railroading, food product development, grain trading, and farming, as well as the related people, labor, and immigrant stories. With multiple entries on two levels, the museum functions as a porous link between downtown Minneapolis and the river. A must-see addition to the riverfront’s menu of cultural attractions, the museum furthers the city’s vision of reconnecting to its birthplace at Saint Anthony Falls.

  6. Madison Public Library Central Library

    The library has been completely transformed to adapt gracefully over time, provide a user-centric environment that addresses both customer and staff needs, and offer a community destination that enhances Madison’s cultural offerings. A huge success, the transformed library has become a popular and vibrant community amenity that has spurred urban redevelopment. Since its reopening in September 2013, the third floor spaces have been continuously booked for everything from art openings and concerts to fundraisers and weddings, and new businesses have opened on adjacent blocks, further increasing the vitality of a part of the city that was previously struggling.

    Potter Lawson served as associate architect, also providing cost estimating and electrical engineering for the project.

  7. URBN Corporate Campus

    Housed in Philadelphia’s historic Navy Yard, this multi-phased corporate campus provides new design studios and office space for the company’s distinctive retail brands, while celebrating the idiosyncratic remnants of 125 years of shipbuilding. Embracing both the history of the Navy Yard and URBN’s modern culture by layering old and new, the design team found inspiration in the factory characteristics of the buildings—industrial materiality, open volumes, and access to daylight—to repurpose the buildings’ major function from production to creativity. The synthesis of four measures—art, culture, economy, and environment—results in the transformation from a production-based yard to a creativity-based campus.

  8. 3M Design Center

    The open, multi-level studio provides ample opportunities for creative collaboration and innovation to occur among designers, customers, business staff, and scientists. Designed to attract top talent from across the globe, the minimalist, living-room type environment encourages outside-in engagement. The range of spaces offered include a quiet zone, collaborative areas, fast prototyping lab, materials library, brand labs, interactive area, and presentation spaces.

  9. North Shore Bank

    The renovation offers a welcoming, customer-focused atmosphere that simultaneously represents the independent, locally-owned bank’s history and position within the Duluth community and supports its forward-thinking approach to banking. The design preserves elements of the building’s mid-century architecture considered sacred, including original wood veneer panels, the vault, terrazzo stairs, a metal wall-mounted clock, wood ceiling beams, travertine flooring, and textured brick walls. The overall layout clusters private offices and closed conference rooms in the center with open public spaces, such as the lobby concierge desk, gallery, entry lounge, social pantry, and writing nook, located along the perimeter. The removal of a large, low soffit that housed a non-operating HVAC system creates a grander experience upon entering the building from Superior Street and draws daylight into the interior. A new audio system, flexible lighting, and a diverse mix of seating support hosted events and special gatherings, as well as everyday operations. A rich palette and composition of bronze, walnut, stone, glass, terrazzo, and wool reflect mid-century modern textures and tones, while also taking cues from the bank’s newly updated brand.

  10. 101 Dupont Place

    Originally serving as the headquarters for DuPont de Nemours, Inc., the Dupont Building is an iconic building within the Rodney Square Historic District in downtown Wilmington. This project involved transforming the historic 13-story building into luxury apartments and office space. Through a neutral materials palette, the design honors the legacy of the building, while reinterpreting classic detailing with a modern approach to keep the building timeless. In an effort to preserve as much of the building’s historic fabric as possible, the executive conferencing suite with a two-story boardroom has been converted into a club room,  lounge, theater, and coworking space. Other amenities include a gym, dog wash station, and roof deck with dramatic views of downtown.