Archives

  1. Norman Public Library East

    The first of two new libraries designed by MSR Design for the Pioneer Library System, the Norman Public Library East branch offers a new community experience inspired by Oklahoma’s iron rich topography, dramatic weather, red dust, and prairie. Located in an area previously without library service, the new building features highly flexible spaces that support collaborative learning, new education models, digital literacy, and information sharing. Registered for LEED v. 3 Silver certification, the project features a range of passive design measures, including a visible stormwater management process and local xeriscape plantings, orienting the building on the site to mitigate solar gain in summer, a thermally treated exterior, and clerestory windows that bring in daylight and direct light to the main entry sequence.

     

  2. Madison Public Library Central Library

    The library has been completely transformed to adapt gracefully over time, provide a user-centric environment that addresses both customer and staff needs, and offer a community destination that enhances Madison’s cultural offerings. A huge success, the transformed library has become a popular and vibrant community amenity that has spurred urban redevelopment. Since its reopening in September 2013, the third floor spaces have been continuously booked for everything from art openings and concerts to fundraisers and weddings, and new businesses have opened on adjacent blocks, further increasing the vitality of a part of the city that was previously struggling.

    Potter Lawson served as associate architect, also providing cost estimating and electrical engineering for the project.

  3. City of Minneapolis Public Service Building

    A design collaboration between Henning Larsen and MSR Design, the new City of Minneapolis Public Service Building provides Minneapolis citizens with a customer-centric experience as the new public service face for the city. Situated next to City Hall, the building helps create a contemporary workplace for city business that reflects the diversity of Minneapolis. It introduces a wholly reimagined public service model. The design features innovative collaborative workspaces, integrated sustainability, and access to daylight as a contributor to a healthy work environment. It is truly a building for everybody. The design invites the public into the building by placing public functions towards Government Plaza. Taking inspiration from the city’s abundant parks and lakes, the design incorporates open community space at street level, gesturing towards City Hall and activating the adjacent plaza. The new building’s main entrance is oriented to minimize wind exposure, with its massing and façade oriented to optimize daylight.

     

     

  4. Paper Mill House

    Sited to be understated as visitors and guests arrive, the structure promotes strong visual connections to the site’s beauty. Flexibly designed with separate dwelling and entertainment wings, the home accommodates comfortable gatherings for groups ranging from 4 to 200 people. Spaces can also be easily closed off and scaled by furnishings to provide intimacy. The house is designed to use 70% less energy per square foot than a standard home, and with the planned addition of hydropower and solar technology, it should achieve near net zero energy consumption.

  5. Minnesota Children’s Museum

    A reorganized interior improves entry sequencing, ticketing, and circulation by moving the main entry from street level to skyway level where 80% of visitors arrive from a parking structure. A new central stair and elevator provide visually clear access to exhibit galleries from the main lobby. New colorful portals offer clear wayfinding to exhibit galleries, which provide neutral and flexible shell space for changing exhibits. The redesigned interior and exterior simplify the visual complexity of the original architecture to provide an orderly backdrop to the energetic chaos created by hundreds of kids engaging with highly interactive exhibits. Annual attendance at the museum has increased by 28% since reopening.

  6. Madison Municipal Building

    Constructed in 1929 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Madison Municipal Building originally functioned as a United States Postal Service facility and federal courthouse. The multi-phased renovation and reorganization uncovers and preserves the building’s historic character, while adapting it to serve 21st-century government functions. The project brings together various local government agencies, previously scattered across two buildings, to improve customer service and inter-agency communication. Certified LEED-NC v. 3 Platinum, the building transformation supports the health and well-being of staff, visitors, and the entire community.

  7. Aeon the Rose Housing

    This new housing complex includes 47 affordable and 43 market rate apartments, underground parking, and various indoor and outdoor community spaces. Using the Living Building Challenge (LBC) as a framework in the process, the designers placed equal emphasis on providing equity and beauty, meeting SB2030 goals for reducing energy 70% below baseline, reducing water use by 50%, and not significantly increasing construction costs over a conventional building. The design incorporates many small measures that add up to significant gains in each of these areas.

  8. Carleton College Weitz Center for Creativity

    The Weitz Center serves as a working laboratory for creativity—not only in the arts, but across the entire curriculum. It positions the college as a national leader in arts programs by creating an environment that fosters creativity, critical thinking, collaborative working skills, and cross-cultural exploration. An adaptive reuse and expansion of a former middle school complex, the center houses the departments of studio arts, dance and theater, and cinema and media studies. It incorporates classrooms, studios, a teaching museum, performance spaces, and state-of-the-art collaborative spaces.

     

     

     

  9. Louisville Free Public Library Southwest Regional Library

    The construction employs a standardized structural steel frame, similar to those used in big box retail stores. The library design focuses on creatively using common materials. Standardized components—including modular masonry, window systems, and raised flooring—form a low maintenance, highly flexible public place. Through scale and a glowing beacon bay, the building establishes a presence in a fragmented environment of scattered building types along a highway. The open, transparent interior offers inviting spaces for different generations of people to experience and clear site lines for service efficiency and enhanced interactions between library staff and customers.

    MSR’s design team collaborated with architect JRA Architects and landscape architect MKSK.

  10. Eastman Nature Center

    The design integrates site, building, and exhibits in order to create a holistic visitor experience in the forest. A long southern facing glass facade brings in light, provides passive solar energy, and extends the exterior paths through the building from the understory on one end to the tree canopy on the other. An active solar array and a geothermal-based heating and cooling system provide much of the building’s energy needs. Operable windows provide ventilation and draw in the sounds and smells of the forest. Roof water feeds a pond to attract birds and animals for human observation.