Archives

  1. Aeon the Rose Housing

    This new housing complex includes 47 affordable and 43 market rate apartments, underground parking, and various indoor and outdoor community spaces. Using the Living Building Challenge (LBC) as a framework in the process, the designers placed equal emphasis on providing equity and beauty, meeting SB2030 goals for reducing energy 70% below baseline, reducing water use by 50%, and not significantly increasing construction costs over a conventional building. The design incorporates many small measures that add up to significant gains in each of these areas.

  2. Trolley Quarter Flats

    Located on the Wisconsin River on the edge of downtown, the site presented challenges. A dilapidated, but structurally-sound trolley shed and wood super-structure (used to lift carriages off the trolley platform for repairs), located on the site, were the last remnants of Wausau’s street trolley system, which operated from 1906 to 1940. Understanding the historic significance of these structures, the developer and design team preserved and incorporated them into the design. The 40-unit complex includes private outdoor areas for all dwelling units, private garden plots for each ground level unit, play and study areas for children inside and outside the building, community space for adults, and parking. It has served as a catalyst for further revitalization of the surrounding neighborhood and to strengthen Wausau’s downtown.

  3. Atrium Lofts

    After completing the Trolley Quarter Flats, the MSR  Design project team noticed an abandoned building next door with an interesting history. The Marathon Shoe Company East Side Plant was the best remaining representation of a leading industry in the City of Wausau in the first half of the 20th century. MSR Design provided analysis, guidance, and encouragement to preserve the historic factory, leading to its placement on the National Register of Historic Places by Preservation Design Works. Working with MetroPlains Development, we transformed the historic structure into market-rate and affordable housing. To retain the building’s character, the design team preserved the large volume, open floor plate, and few internal walls. The design enhances daylight throughout the space, using clerestory windows to fill the central volume and large windows in each unit.